Podcasts

Podcast: Whack-a-Mole

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This week, Jaime, Elaina, and Gabe discuss Preterm v. Kasich, the latest case by an abortion clinic to challenge restrictions passed by John Kasich. This week, the Ohio Supreme Court heard oral arguments as the clinic makes their case that transfer agreements and mandatory ultrasounds were passed illegally as budget amendments.

Join us…

…and be sure to check your voter registration!


NARAL’s The Morning After is a production of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio.

We’re proud to announce that NARAL’s The Morning After will air in Columbus on WGRN94.1FM on Friday mornings at 9 a.m.

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Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

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Podcasts

Podcast: Jasmine & New Voices!

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This week, Jaime, and Gabe discuss New Voices for Reproductive Justice with Jasmine Burnett. New Voices is a grassroots Human Rights organization for women of color, led by women of color and about women of color. They utilize the Reproductive Justice framework as an innovative strategy to specifically engage Black women and girls in community organizing for lasting social change!

Find New Voices on Facebook and Twitter.

Jasmine came to share information about a new report: In Our Own Voice (.pdf). As a national-state partnership, In Our Own Voice focuses on lifting up the voices of Black women leaders at the national, regional, and state levels in our ongoing policy fight to secure Reproductive Justice for all women and girls.

She’s also excited for the upcoming March for Black Women in Washington D.C. on September 30, 2017.

In Cleveland, you can join NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio on September 25 for the Pro-Choice Femiknits meeting. Come craft with us!


NARAL’s The Morning After is a production of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio.

We’re proud to announce that NARAL’s The Morning After will air in Columbus on WGRN94.1FM on Friday mornings at 9 a.m.

SunriseWide4


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

Podcasts

Holy Toledo

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This week, Kellie, Vashitta, and Gabe discuss Capital Care Network in Toledo. An August 30 Toledo City Council meeting to support a clinic protection ordinance heard testimony from clinic escorts, staff, and patients who have sen harassment by protesters first hand.

Part 2 of the Toledo City Council hearing

This week, Toledo’s Capital Care was again the focus of a hearing, this time in the Ohio Supreme Court. Clinic attorney Jennifer Branch presented an argument that John Kasich‘s “transfer agreement” rule is unconstitutional.

Full video of the Ohio Supreme Court hearing for Capital Care Network of Toledo v. Ohio Dept. of Health

Also on Tuesday, the Ohio Senate Committee on Health heard our testimony on the Down syndrome abortion ban. Kellie testified that afternoon after we recorded this podcast.

Full committee video on the Down syndrome abortion ban

Finally, we discussed the possibility of a Total Abortion Ban, which became a much more serious notion later in the week when we learned that Janet Folger Porter, author of the “Heartbeat Bill” visited the White House to discuss a national version of the same ban.

We’ll definitely be discussing that idea more, next week.


NARAL’s The Morning After is a production of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio.

We’re proud to announce that NARAL’s The Morning After will air in Columbus on WGRN94.1FM on Friday mornings at 9 a.m.

SunriseWide4


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

Blog Post

Testimony of Kellie Copeland against Senate Bill 164

Our Executive Director, Kellie Copeland, testified against Senate Bill 164, the Down syndrome abortion ban. Her full testimony appears below.

Chairman Burke, Vice Chairman Beagle, Ranking Member Tavares, and members of the Ohio Senate Committee on Health, Human Services and Medicaid, my name is Kellie Copeland. I am the executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio. I am here to speak in opposition to S.B. 164 on behalf of our more than 20,000 activists and members in Ohio.

Over the last couple of years that the policies in this bill have been debated in the Ohio House and the Ohio Senate, some supporters have claimed this legislation is not about abortion. Although I respect the convictions of these people, I must unequivocally disagree.  If this bill is not about abortion, why is its sole purpose banning abortion services to a specific group of women in our state?  The true motive of this bill is the same as other abortion bans recently enacted in Ohio: to in the short term limit access to a health care procedure, and in the long term to ultimately overturn Roe v. Wade making abortion illegal in our country. This particular abortion ban is unconstitutional because it would ban abortion well before the point of viability, a clear challenge to Roe v. Wade.

Beyond the unconstitutionality of S.B. 164, we have serious concerns about the imprecise language used in this bill. As written, this bill would forbid a physician from performing, inducing, or attempting to perform or induce an abortion if “the person has knowledge that the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion, in whole or in part,” due to a “test result indicating Down syndrome,” a “prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome,” or “any other reason to believe” the fetus has Down syndrome.

How would the court define “knowledge” and what would be considered “any other reason to believe” the fetus had Down syndrome? Would a doctor have cause to believe any woman over age 40 (who, because of advanced maternal age, has a higher risk of having a child with Down syndrome) would possibly be terminating the pregnancy because of a potential Down syndrome diagnosis? How would a doctor be able to prove that he or she had no reason to believe this was the case? Would “knowledge” include knowing that a woman had a diagnostic test for Down syndrome without knowing the outcome of the test? Or would “knowledge” only be if the woman specifically told the doctor she was having the abortion at least in part because of a prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis?

This type of uncertainty would create a chilling effect on the medical profession in Ohio. Doctors would face a fourth-degree felony and the loss of their medical license if they thought they followed the law, but a local prosecutor decided that they didn’t do enough to fit the prosecutor’s interpretation of the definition of “knowledge.”

This bill would encourage patients to withhold information from their medical provider, because if the patient did disclose her reason for seeking abortion care to her physician, the physician would no longer be able to perform the procedure without facing felony charges and the loss of their medical license. The Ohio Legislature should not pass laws that force patients to withhold critical medical information from their physicians.

When a woman faces a complicated medical diagnosis during pregnancy there are a million things that go through her mind. Some of the questions she will try to answer include:

  • Can I raise a child with disabilities?
  • Do I have access to health care?
  • Are there services for people with disabilities in my community?
  • Can I take the time off work needed to take care of my child?
  • Do I have maternity leave so that my child and I can figure out this complicated diagnosis?
  • Do I have access to specialists to help my child develop, as well as medical professionals to treat possible medical complications?
  • Does my school system have adequate programs in place to educate my child so that they can grow to their full potential?
  • Do I have the support system I need to navigate this new world?

Does this legislation help address any of these issues? No, it does not. The future of Medicaid expansion in Ohio, a program that families across the state who have children with special needs rely on to help take care of their children’s complicated healthcare needs, remains uncertain. According to the Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, special education funding in Ohio fell $210 million dollars short of what was needed. Advocates are currently suing the state of Ohio because underfunding of our school systems in general has left districts without sufficient resources to provide the proper level of education for special needs students in their districts. Our nation as a whole, and specifically our state, falls woefully behind in the provision of paid leave for workers. How are these families supposed to be able to take care of a child with special needs when 45.9% of workers in our state have no access to paid leave, forcing a parent to have to choose between their child’s needs and losing their job?

If the Ohio General Assembly truly wants to address the needs of families raising children with special needs, and we at NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio strongly encourage you to do so, these are the issues that should be addressed.

During a pregnancy, a woman can be faced with many deeply personal and often complex decisions. Ultimately, decisions about whether to choose adoption, end a pregnancy, or raise a child must be left to the woman and the counsel of those she trusts–her family, her health care provider, and her faith community—not the legislature. Thank you for this opportunity to address your committee. I urge you to vote no on S.B. 164 and am happy to try to answer any questions you may have.


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

 

Blog Post

Where do we go from here?

In lieu of recent events I think it is befitting for me as a person and woman of color to ask the question ‘where do we go from here’? After the sad state of violence that occurred in Charlottesville I wonder what is yet to come. Unfortunately, we live in the days where people seem to enjoy copying violence; for example, school shootings. Now we have extremely violent protest and one can only wonder will there be more to come? Who will be targeted?

As a black woman I often worry about the safety of myself and my family. Just last week a home in Westerville was vandalized with the word “JEW” written in shaving cream on the driveway and this is now being investigated as a hate crime. There were also flyers sent out around the same area from a group claiming to be national socialist.

This is extremely disturbing and as most of us realize it is really starting to take place in our own neighborhoods. Where do we go from here as a nation? Do we allow others to bring violence, racial slurs, and hate into our communities? Do we band together for the greater good and focus on ways to rebuild? Do we say every man for himself and ignore these hateful acts as we go on about our daily lives as if none of this exist? I can only speak for myself when I say I will continue to fight for peace, love my neighbor, and allow my voice to be heard. I refuse to turn a blind eye to the negativity surrounding myself and my children. If I don’t fight for anything else I will fight for their right to live in a country where they are “not judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character”

Reproductive Justice is an ongoing fight as more and more rights are being taken away from all women. So, whether or not I’m fighting for reproductive justice or racial justice or social justice I will continue to fight because it is our human right to have justice. It is our human right as women to be able to make our own choices about what happens to our body. It is our basic right to be able to live in a society where we aren’t hated because we have darker skin or because of the texture of our hair. It is our moral right to speak up when we witness injustice and to love everyone and not fight violence with violence but with peace, love, and positivity.

If you’re reading this blog and not sure what it is that needs to be done just simply ask yourself “Where do we go from here?”

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Vashitta Johnson
State Field and Political Director
NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

Blog Post

When is the best time to get a vasectomy?

So, you or your partner has decided it’s time for a vasectomy.  There’s really only two reasons why guys would pursue sterilization:

  1. You really, really never want kids.
  2. You have exactly the number of kids you want.

Despite there being just two reasons, everyone’s exact situation is different. For my wife and I, we consider ourselves lucky to have two offspring… but we’re done. When she was looking into replacing her IUD, I decided that preventing an Oops Baby wasn’t just a wifely duty.

Things to know when considering a vasectomy: (THIS IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE.)

  • A vasectomy is not reversible.
  • Ok, so theoretically they are reversible, but there’s zero guarantee of success and the reversal attempt is ridiculously expensive. If you’re considering getting one and undoing it later, your doctor will probably stop you right there.
  • A vasectomy may be covered by your insurance. I paid $20 for the consult and $200 for the surgery.
  • There’s no difference in how you feel or function in any way after the procedure.
  • Have more questions? Seek out a urologist and get a consult.
  • When the nurse tells you to take off your pants because the doctor will be right in, she’s lying. Leave your pants on because 20 minutes sitting in a paper gown is a damn long time.

Now that you’ve got your consult scheduled, here’s what will happen:

  • The doctor will briefly examine your twig and berries and answer any questions you have.
  • The nurse will give you printed instructions on how to shave your balls and a prescription for a mild painkiller to fill in advance of the procedure.
  • They’ll schedule your surgery date.

So, here’s the question: when should you get a vasectomy?

You’ll probably have the surgery on a Friday. Many guys aim for March Madness, but that’s a long way off and the popular trend is going to cause a backlog of appointments then.

You want a weekend when you can really take advantage of some quality couch time, which means…

The best date in 2017 for a vasectomy is Friday, November 3rd.

Why is this date superior?

  • All the Halloween parties are over, so you’re not missing out…
  • …but you still have a massive amount of leftover candy laying around.
  • College football is at its best in early November.
  • No one takes vacation in early November, so you’re not competing with co-workers to get the sick time approved.
  • You’ll be all healed in time for holiday partying.
  • Most important: the weekend starting 11/4/17 is when the time changes, so clocks Fall forward giving you an extra hour to sleep.

Good luck with the ball shaving, and happy snipping!


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio

Podcasts

Racial violence in America

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This week, Jaime, Elaina, and Gabe discuss the violence in Charlottesville, VA. One woman, Heather Heyer, was killed while protesting white supremacist groups, and the nation was sent into an intense debate over racism, Confederate statues, Tina Fey, and Donald Trump’s failure to condemn hate groups.

In Ohio, we were keeping an eye on the state legislature. The Down syndrome abortion ban returned for a second hearing this year. The bill was previously considered in 2015, when the Toledo Blade and New York Times both issued editorials against it. Rep. Janine Boyd and Rep. Stephanie Howse wrote against it in the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Finally, parents like David Perry wrote against the bill for CNN.

In Cleveland, Preterm hosted an event with Dr. Willie Parker, an abortion provider from Alabama. He came to discuss his new book, Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice. While he spoke, an artist captured some of his ideas on canvass.

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NARAL’s The Morning After is a production of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio.

We’re proud to announce that NARAL’s The Morning After will air in Columbus on WGRN94.1FM on Friday mornings at 9 a.m.

SunriseWide4


Help build a pro-choice Ohio. Every day, NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio fights to protect access to the full range of reproductive health care options—including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and safe & legal abortion care. We educate the public about the real threat to women’s healthcare posed by anti-choice legislation and policies. We mobilize pro-choice Ohioans to take political action to defend reproductive rights. And we are the voice for Ohio’s abortion clinics, helping them navigate the increasingly hostile climate created by extremist groups. But we need your help. As a member organization, we rely on your financial support to fund our important legislative, educational, and grassroots activities.

Contribute to NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio